10 Misconceptions about Migrants and Refugees

10 Misconceptions about Migrants and Refugees

  Why shouldn’t we always believe what we hear? Following the recent Syrian crisis, much controversy has arisen surrounding Europe’s response to migrants and refugees. The UK has largely come under fire for only agreeing to resettle 20,000 migrants and refugees over the next five years. Prime Minster David Cameron added further fuel to the

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Why shouldn’t we always believe what we hear?

Following the recent Syrian crisis, much controversy has arisen surrounding Europe’s response to migrants and refugees.

The UK has largely come under fire for only agreeing to resettle 20,000 migrants and refugees over the next five years. Prime Minster David Cameron added further fuel to the fire by describing those trying to enter the UK at Calais as a “swarm” of migrants.

Firstly, migrants and refugees are not the same. Following complaints from members of the public concerning coverage of the Syrian refugee crisis, the BBC recently readjusted its terminology according to the below:

migrant refugee

 

Source: Twitter

 

1. They’re here to steal our jobs

According to the Daily Express in 2014, “Of the UK’s 13 million low-skilled jobs, 2.1 million are held by migrant workers”.

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Source: southpark.cc.com

With that logic, of the UK’s 13 million low-skilled jobs, a whopping 10.9 million jobs aren’t held by migrant workers. How abysmal.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/06/25/9-calais-migrants-and-why-they-want-to-come-to-the-uk_n_7661826.html 

 

2. They’re uneducated layabouts

Of course, when “foreigners” aren’t stealing our jobs they’re stealing our welfare state, right?

Pretty wrong.

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Many studies have shown that immigrants are less likely to claim benefits than native Britons. Minuscule numbers of asylum seekers rely on state support. When they do, it’s because law prevents asylum seekers from being employed while their application for asylum is being processed.

 

3. You can’t own a piece of technology if you’re a migrant or refugee

Members of the public reacted with shock when pictures arose of migrants at mobile phone charging points.

The BBC has recently shown why mobile phones are a lifeline for migrants and refugees:

 

4. They’re trying to takeover our country by changing our laws

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Source: Britain Furst

Sharia Law, the Islamic legal system, gets a heck of a lot of stick in the UK. Many Sharia councils exist for reasons such as assisting with family issues, offering advice like meditation.

Here’s the BBC low-down on Sharia: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-27307249

 

5. They are spreading ISIS values

The “Islamic State” and other terror organisations already have a network of collaborators in Europe. Sending terrorists among refugees on the very dangerous route to Europe seems like a rather unlikely strategy, as it is probable that they may not survive the journey or may be caught by the authorities at one of the many borders they would have to cross.

 

6. They’re here to rape our women and children

Yep, it’s really men lurking beneath those Burkhas. Of course, 79.567567% of those on the Sex Offenders’ Register are Muslim migrants and refugees.*sarcasm may occur*.

Recently Donald Trump, U.S. Presidential Candidate, came under fire for calling out Mexican immigrants as “rapists and drug-dealers”.

 

7. Their money isn’t being circulated around Britain

It wasn’t bankers that caused the credit crunch, it was refugees. Couple o’ migrants too, all sending money to their families at home. Taking away British money from the hard-working British taxpayer.

www.public-domain-image.com (public domain image)

www.public-domain-image.com (public domain image)

Migrants and refugees actually contribute to the economy. EU immigrants contribute £463 per second in revenue for the UK, according to CITY A.M. article published in 2015. The majority come here to work, which in turn brings new investment to the country, starts up new companies and creates the jobs we need.

 

8. They all sneaked into the country on the back of a lorry or boat

giphy-2

 

Boat and lorry migration often makes the headlines due to the hundreds of deaths which often occur with this method of transportation. Almost all migrants and refugees arrive by airport.

In Europe during 2015, the most common form of entry was walking.

Source: giphy.com

 

9. All refugees and migrants are Muslim

Whilst this article has presented the “token” (if there ever is one!) refugee and migrant as Muslim, many are also Christian.

Whilst the number of Christian migrants wishing to travel to Europe is uncertain, Slovakia plans to accept 200 Christian migrants from camps in Turkey, Italy and Greece.

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Source: Britain Furst 

10. All refugees are safe as soon as they arrive in the UK

Perhaps the greatest fear of every refugee is that they will face deportation.

Many refugees were refused entry into the UK, according to The Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford. In 2014 only 28% of the refugees were granted access. This is next to nothing compared with countries like Germany or France (which have nearly 4 or 5 times more asylum applications).

Safety means that one feels protected from danger. But with the prejudices and racism that the refugees encounter, it must be hard to feel protected.

The Gillard Government made a commitment in 2010 to release all children from immigration detention by June 2011, but still 1000 children languish in the harsh environment of immigration camps around Australia. The Refugee Action Collective organised a protest on July 9, 2011 outside the Melbourne Immigration Transit accommodation which is used for the detention of unaccompanied minors.

The Gillard Government made a commitment in 2010 to release all children from immigration detention by June 2011, but still 1000 children languish in the harsh environment of immigration camps around Australia. The Refugee Action Collective organised a protest on July 9, 2011 outside the Melbourne Immigration Transit accommodation which is used for the detention of unaccompanied minors.

Source: Flickr

In order to create a change, we hope that this article has helped to tackle some of the common misconceptions. 

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